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In today’s market, end users are always demanding more from their pumps. New technologies must meet specific system requirements, keep maintenance costs low, ensure long product life and save energy. Manufacturing companies face increasing costs for material and energy in a market that has become competitive on a global scale.

Agriculture is a dominant industry worldwide. Demand for agricultural products is expected to steadily build as populations continue to grow, primarily in regions such as Asia and Latin America. Meanwhile, North America is regaining its dominant export position, and Africa and Asia are expected to increase net imports to meet demands.

The Jordan, Knauff & Company (JKC) Valve Stock Index was up 0.1 percent during the last 12 months, much lower than the broader S&P 500 Index, which was up 14.5 percent. The JKC Pump Stock Index decreased 4.5 percent for the same period.1

Established in 1896, the F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd. company, today known as Roche, is recognized as the world’s fifth largest pharmaceutical company. It operates in locations around the globe, including the U.S., Ireland, Germany and Pakistan. Roche’s operations are divided into two core businesses: Pharmaceuticals and Diagnostics.

My previous two columns have described assessing a system that does not use controls. In the first part (Pumps & Systems, October 2014) the assessment process was detailed. Last month, I covered performing the system calculations (Pumps & Systems, November 2014). This column considers the proposed improvements to the system (see Figure 1).

Last year, “Reduce Thrust and Extend Bearing Life” (Pumps & Systems, December 2013) discussed the benefits and some potential pitfalls of adjusting the axial clearance of American National Standards Institute (ANSI) end-suction pumps.

Water is the lifeblood of agriculture, and the lack of it can limit the productivity of an otherwise economically attractive piece of property. Therefore, getting water to the crops is a critical part of a grower’s job and often represents a major cost. When pumping is necessary, the cost of getting power to the pump and the cost of electricity for operation can be significant.

For those of you old enough to remember Lawrence Welk, you’ll notice that the title of this brief column is the final quote from his show’s closing song. I am still a loyal fan of his reruns today.

Priming and repriming agricultural pumps pose several challenges. The water source is almost always beneath the inlet piping of the pump, demanding greater net positive suction head required (NPSHR). Topography constraints often dictate where an inlet pipe can be dropped, further limiting solutions to the increased NPSHR problem.

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For those of you old enough to remember Lawrence Welk, you’ll notice that the title of this brief column is the final quote from his show’s closing song. I am still a loyal fan of his reruns today.

Last year, “Reduce Thrust and Extend Bearing Life” (Pumps & Systems, December 2013) discussed the benefits and some potential pitfalls of adjusting the axial clearance of American National Standards Ins

A reciprocating power pump, as depicted in Figure 1, is a displacement machine. It has characteristics that are different than a centrifugal pump.

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Abundant oil supplies from U.S. shale producers may have upset global markets in recent months, but one resource may present even more of a challenge to the international community in 2015—clean water. Demand has clearly outstripped supply in some of the world’s most arid regions.

My previous two columns have described assessing a system that does not use controls. In the first part (Pumps & Systems, October 2014) the assessment process was detailed. Last month, I covered performing the system calculations (Pumps & Systems, November 2014).

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