Joe Evans

As a follow up on my AC Motors series, I thought it would be a good idea to provide a short overview of work, power and torque as it applies to the AC motor.
As a follow up on my AC Motors series, I thought it would be a good idea to provide a short overview of work, power and torque as it applies to the AC motor.
The frame sizes (physical dimensions) of AC motors have changed substantially through the years. Originally, they were considerably larger than those in use today. This increased size was the result of inefficiency and the need to dissipate heat.
One of the major impacts on motor life is common sense—or maybe the lack thereof!
Last month, we studied the properties and effects of resistive, inductive and capacitive loads in an AC circuit.
This month we will quickly look at the load types that comprise a typical AC circuit.
Energy efficiency and reduced consumption are important issues in the pump and motor marketplace.
Starting can have a significant effect on the life of the winding insulation of an AC motor.
Why do those three affinity laws do such a good job of predicting the performance of a centrifugal pump when its rotational speed or impeller diameter is changed?
Curve shapes reveal a pump's range of peak efficiency.
The performance of a centrifugal pump with a trimmed impeller will follow the affinity laws as long as that trim is relatively small.
In this multi-part series, we will investigate several aspects of centrifugal pump efficiency. First of Five Parts
Factors to consider when deciding the priority of pump efficiency.
About 900 years before Newton formulated his universal gravitational theory, the Greek philosopher Aristotle espoused something different.
A number of choices are available when connecting pumps, fans and other rotating equipment to an electric motor. There are numerous mechanical and fluid coupling designs and, in some cases, a belt drive option is available.
Keeping a close eye on pump efficiency can lead to energy savings.
Rotary pumps are positive displacement pumps that use rotational, rather than reciprocating, motion during their pumping cycle. They can be designed to pump liquids, solids, gases or mixtures of all three.
My September tutorial took a look at the affinity laws and showed why each is able to predict changes in flow, head, and power when there is a change in pump speed or impeller diameter.

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