Motors

The low voltage motors market is highly consolidated, with the top five participants accounting for more than 75 percent of the market revenues as of 2009. Low voltage alternating current (AC) motors dominate the industry, generating 92.1 percent of market revenues for 2009. That number is expected to increase to 95.9 percent by 2016, with a Combined Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 7.6 percent between 2006 and 2016. Low voltage direct current (DC) motors, on the other hand, are expected to have a negative 3.4 percent CAGR between those years.
Even when a redundant pumping system is in place, it can be advisable to monitor the condition of the operating units in critical applications where maintaining production depends on motor-pump reliability.
Construction features are key to vertical motor application and maintenance.
Improvements in performance and energy reduction can be achieved with smart drives and system optimization.
Energy is the largest ongoing cost of mixer operation, so it is vital to carefully consider the energy-to-thrust ratio (sometimes called the “water-to-wire” ratio) for each and every mixer application.
Equipment and technology improvements can be sound investments.
Most of the electric motor information we use on a daily basis is pretty straightforward.
Due to the delicate nature of the cranberry, pump failure is not an option.
Currents are induced on the motor shafts when AC motors are employed with VFDs to drive air pumps, chillwater pumps and compressors in HVAC/R systems. Without a grounding device, these currents typically discharge through the motor bearings, causing frosting, pitting, fusion craters, and fluting.
The RPMAC PM Direct Drive Cooling Tower Motor and VS1CTD Drive for wet cooling towers replaces an existing motor, jack shaft and gearbox with a more efficient and environmentally responsible variable speed motor and drive with the motor mounted directly under the fan.
In many pump installations, problems such as jams and suction loss can lead to serious damage to the motor or pump long before the thermal overloads trip.
With highly reliable electrical systems, protective relays may be called upon to operate very infrequently.
With highly reliable electrical systems, protective relays may be called upon to operate very infrequently.
Proper alignment of the pump shaft with the driver can reduce vibration and significantly improve reliability.
Proper alignment of the pump shaft with the driver can reduce vibration and significantly improve reliability.
Unanticipated noise and vibration can be problematic for both occupants and processes within structures.
This article explains the differences between electromechanical and electronic overload relays and shows how the latter can provide better motor protection and increase safety.
Last September, we spoke about the importance of pipe-to-piping alignment, evaluating actual numbers, and tabulating stress values as they approach yield stress of pipe at various values of misalignment. This time, we will discuss the effects of pump-to-motor misalignment, beyond hype or generalities, by numerically quantifying the conclusions.
Owing partly to tradition, the shafts of electric motors are often larger than those of the equipment they drive.
Bigger is better — or at least it used to be
How do I move from my situation to a better one? In other words, is it possible to retrofit a less-than-optimal installation with a better solution, and how?
New motor starting controller provides one solution.

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