September 2009 Issue

In the foothills of the Andes, among the sprawling vineyards of picturesque Mendoza, Argentina, stands an innocuous equipment cabinet located by the side of an infrequently used mountain pass. The cabinet's superficial surface rust belies its importance as one of the most significant technological developments in modern day corrosion prevention. The cubicle, battered from years of an abrasive cocktail of arid Patagonian winds and coarse earth, hides the cradle of a revolutionary approach to cathodic protection. The equipment within the cabinet resulted in an entirely new range of products.
Understanding how labyrinth seals function is imperative to ensure the appropriate seal technology is specified. Seal selection, when matched appropriately to the expected application and environment to which the equipment will be exposed, will directly impact seal life, productivity and total maintenance costs. Armed with this knowledge, users are encouraged to work with seal manufacturers to match seal technologies appropriately with application needs.
Compared to conventional oil, synthetic crude from bitumen is expensive and complicated to produce.
The March 2009 Sealing Sense concluded that pipe strain can cause failure of the packing or mechanical seal since they are both sensitive to misalignments introduced by pipe strain.
Although the use of transmitters in pressure measurement is growing, mechanical pressure gauges are still used on most systems as local pressure display to back up electrical readings. The selection and installation of these gauges can be difficult in certain locations. Harsh conditions that can require special consideration include vibration, pressure pulsation, overpressure, corrosive media and extreme process and ambient temperatures. This article is designed to address harsh conditions with best practice recommendations to extend gauge life and provide for the safest installation possible.
Many pump designs fall into the positive displacement (PD) category, but, for the most part, they can be divided into two basic groups.
Understanding technology capabilities and application requirements is important when selecting a wireless technology for an application. The reasons to choose wireless include reduced installation costs, installation and deployment flexibility and the ability to address new applications. Before selecting wireless, first ensure the bandwidth available with wireless meets the application requirements.
Our attempts to normalize or classify water turbine hydraulic performance culminated in 1915 with the development of the specific speed concept, which was later applied to centrifugal pumps.
Third in a series. Advances in wireless technologies can help address many common failure modes in mid- to low-level criticality assets and eliminate wiring costs for a range of asset types.
Wireless technology is part of our everyday lives in the home and office. From garage door openers and television remote controls, to cellular telephones and wireless Internet access, radio frequency (RF) technology has been accepted as a reliable, efficient and easy-to-use medium.

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