Proper alignment of the pump shaft with the driver can reduce vibration and significantly improve reliability.

Although a number of AC motor designs are used, the induction motor is, by far, the most common and will be the topic of this column.

Because operational costs ride on efficiency determinations, accurate measurements of losses occurring within the motor are paramount. The reliability of efficiency data is key to any energy-savings plan, and knowing the meaning behind the rating can make or break a smart purchasing decision.

Data-driven visibility helps protect industrial processes and motors.

Last month, we studied the properties and effects of resistive, inductive and capacitive loads in an AC circuit.

Due to the expense and labor required, most facilities need to maximize the life of their motors.

Most of us probably never notice the spinning cylinder mounted between the pump and motor, except how easy it is to dis/assemble when a pump or motor is changed out.

A paper or an electronic work order system can be used to capture alignment data.

Energy efficiency may not always mean total efficiency.

The pump industry is the largest purchaser of electric motors in the United States.

It is impossible to balance line-to-line voltages perfectly in a three-phase circuit.

Mechanically generated sparks, electrostatic discharge and high surface temperatures are all potential ignition sources in explosive atmospheres.

The frame sizes (physical dimensions) of AC motors have changed substantially through the years. Originally, they were considerably larger than those in use today. This increased size was the result of inefficiency and the need to dissipate heat.

Construction features are key to vertical motor application and maintenance.

A large wastewater processing plant experienced continual problems with its influent raw wastewater pumps for several years.

In June, 2007, a reader asked Electrical Apparatus magazine, "How long should motor bearings last?" The answer will astound you.

Unanticipated noise and vibration can be problematic for both occupants and processes within structures.

The low voltage motors market is highly consolidated, with the top five participants accounting for more than 75 percent of the market revenues as of 2009. Low voltage alternating current (AC) motors dominate the industry, generating 92.1 percent of market revenues for 2009. That number is expected to increase to 95.9 percent by 2016, with a Combined Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 7.6 percent between 2006 and 2016. Low voltage direct current (DC) motors, on the other hand, are expected to have a negative 3.4 percent CAGR between those years.

One of the major impacts on motor life is common sense—or maybe the lack thereof!

Last month we took a close look at the flow of voltage and current in purely resistive and inductive circuits.

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