When maintaining motors, proactive strategies are required.

Energy efficiency may not always mean total efficiency.

The pump industry is the largest purchaser of electric motors in the United States.

In June, 2007, a reader asked Electrical Apparatus magazine, "How long should motor bearings last?" The answer will astound you.

Unanticipated noise and vibration can be problematic for both occupants and processes within structures.

Energy efficiency and reduced consumption are important issues in the pump and motor marketplace.

Last September, we spoke about the importance of pipe-to-piping alignment, evaluating actual numbers, and tabulating stress values as they approach yield stress of pipe at various values of misalignment. This time, we will discuss the effects of pump-to-motor misalignment, beyond hype or generalities, by numerically quantifying the conclusions.

Construction features are key to vertical motor application and maintenance.

A large wastewater processing plant experienced continual problems with its influent raw wastewater pumps for several years.

When a motor fails, users can (1) rewind, possibly for high efficiency; (2) replace the failed motor with a new motor; or (3) invest in a premium efficiency product.

How do I move from my situation to a better one? In other words, is it possible to retrofit a less-than-optimal installation with a better solution, and how?

Following the development of variable frequency converter drives during the 1990s, totally enclosed fan-cooled (TEFC) AC induction motors became viable options for replacing DC motors in pumping ap

Due to the expense and labor required, most facilities need to maximize the life of their motors. Electrical, insulation resistance and thermal measurement are three tests that can troubleshoot motors, drives and associ­ated electrical panels and prolong their operational lifetime. Ther­mal imagers can detect potential problems and insulation resistance and electrical tests can deter­mine the cause.

One of the major impacts on motor life is common sense—or maybe the lack thereof!

Last month we took a close look at the flow of voltage and current in purely resistive and inductive circuits.

With highly reliable electrical systems, protective relays may be called upon to operate very infrequently.

The pump industry is the largest purchaser of electric motors in the United States.

The global economic downturn has resulted in an unprecedented attempt by world governments to help stimulate their individual economies, with the hope that these combined efforts will have a cumulative effect of breaking the downward spiral and lifting the global economy out of its crisis.

Water and wastewater systems in the United States use a tremendous amount of power. The EPA estimates that these systems use 50 trillion watt-hours annually at a cost of $4 billion. Combined with electric rate increases upward of 20 percent in a single year, water and wastewater system operators are left with an enormous strain on their budget.

Shaft failures do not happen everyday, but when they do, it can be a challenge to determine the cause of failure. Here's a technical explanation of what happens when the shaft bends or breaks.

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