These pumps offer efficiency and reliability in complex industrial operations.
by Chrishelle Rogers (Maag Industrial Pumps)
August 10, 2015

Pumps make industrial manufacturing possible. Every day, thousands of industries around the world rely on various pumping technologies to move raw materials and end products through the production process. Whether handling lube oils, paints and coatings, or working in applications from heat transfer to chemical processing, pumps must reliably, efficiently and safely transfer an array of fluids, all of which have unique—and often challenging—handling characteristics.

If a pump is the weak link in the production process, the entire operation will be compromised, with the downtime required for repair or replacement eating away at production quotas and the bottom line.

Image 1. In order to fashion a handling and transfer operation that optimizes reliability, efficiency and safety, many chemical processors are making the decision to install internal gear pumps. (Images courtesy of PSG)Image 1. In order to fashion a handling and transfer operation that optimizes reliability, efficiency and safety, many chemical processors are making the decision to install internal gear pumps. (Images courtesy of PSG)

Industrial manufacturers can choose from a wide range of pump options when outfitting their facilities. A number of factors also go into choosing pumping technology. Operational reliability and the ability to meet specific fluid-handling requirements are among the most important. With manufacturing operations governed by operating budgets and expenses, equipment acquisition costs and subsequent maintenance are also primary concerns.

While all pumping technologies can have positive points in industrial manufacturing operations, positive displacement internal gear pumps can offer precise and consistent transfer of demanding fluids.

Chemical processing and manufacturing is one of the most complex industrial operations. The chemical manufacturing process is so intricate that it is comprised of several unit operations, from cracking, distillation and evaporation, to gas absorption, scrubbing and solvent extraction.

Image 2. No acid, polymer, resin or caustic has the same handling characteristics, which makes pump versatility a primary concern for chemical processors. These internal gear pumps overcome many handling concerns by featuring a method of operation that can successfully and safely transfer fluids of differing viscosities and chemical makeups.Image 2. No acid, polymer, resin or caustic has the same handling characteristics, which makes pump versatility a primary concern for chemical processors. These internal gear pumps overcome many handling concerns by featuring a method of operation that can successfully and safely transfer fluids of differing viscosities and chemical makeups.

Within that family of unit operations, fluid transfer touches every stage of the manufacturing process and is vital for overall process success. Often oversimplified as "transporting fluid from one point to another," fluid transfer in chemical manufacturing is much more.

Fluid transfer includes a spectrum of applications, with responsibilities all along the chemical production chain. For example, thin or viscous raw materials can be transferred to storage tanks or blending and mixing tanks. Final formulations can be transferred to holding tanks, and finished products can be loaded into intermediate bulk containers (IBCs) for delivery or consumer packaging.

In many cases, chemical manufacturing processes require the use of dangerous substances, such as strong acids, caustics, solvents, resins and polymers. Despite their inherent danger, these are necessary for the manufacture of thousands of consumer goods or to facilitate other industrial processes. The challenge when using dangerous chemicals is to construct, handle and transfer them in a safe and reliable way.

Fortunately for chemical processors, positive displacement internal gear pumps have continually offered the reliability and cost-effectiveness required for handling raw materials and finished products.

One manufacturer has created an internal gear pump with a simple design that includes only two moving parts, a pair of coinciding gears called the rotor and idler, for precise and consistent transfer of demanding fluids.

This design creates a four-step operating process:

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