by Chris Dietzsch
May 27, 2010

Another innovation resulting in increased efficiency and energy savings was the incorporation of "advanced porting." Advanced porting introduced larger air ports to the ADS that allow exhaust air to leave the pumping chamber with as little restriction as possible. At the same time the size of the inlet air ports was optimized to maximize the flow rate and increase efficiency.

The latest generation of AODD pumps has added another level of adjustability to the ADS with the invention and incorporation of an Efficiency Management System (EMS). The EMS allows the end user to adjust the size of the air inlet ports. Decreasing the size of the inlet ports restricts the air flow rate into the air chamber. It allows some control over how much and how quickly the air chamber is filled and can prevent the chamber from "overcharging" with air.

This integrated feature allows the end user to optimize performance when operating the pump at their desired inlet air pressure by adjusting the air inlet passage size until the fluid flow requirement is met. This ensures that the pump is running in its most efficient state while still meeting the user's flow requirements, pumping only what is necessary while using the least amount of air to do so. (See sidebar for example of savings.)

An exploded view of an Efficiency Management System (EMS). The integrated feature of the EMS allows the user to optimize performance when operating the pump at the desired inlet air pressure by adjusting the air inlet passage size until the fluid flow requirement is met. This ensures that the pump is running in its most efficient state while still meeting the user's flow requirements, pumping only what is necessary while using the least amount of air to do so.

Using the EMS to reduce the size of the inlet air ports and restrict air flow into the air chambers has the added benefits of increasing diaphragm life (reducing maintenance costs) and increasing dry vacuum.

In addition to improvements to the ADS, advancements are being made to the wetted path to reduce friction losses. The reduced friction losses result in an increased fluid flow rate without necessarily increasing air consumption. These improved wetted paths have been designed to "drop-in" to existing applications by employing common mounting footprints and fluid connections.

Conclusion

In these days of shrinking budgets and threatened bottom lines, finding the most efficient way to run a manufacturing operation is of the utmost importance. Savvy facility managers are replacing older AODD technology with new pumps that feature advanced ADS systems and EMS technology.

Many manufacturers have evaluated their operations, isolated the areas of inefficiency and enhanced their return on investment through the introduction of pumping technologies that promise increased efficiency and lower energy costs. AODD pumping technology that uses an EMS can reduce operating and energy costs, allow for more pumps in the same factory without adding compressor capacity and provide long-term benefits to the manufacturing operation.

Example of EMS Efficiency

A test was conducted involving a 2 in air operated double diaphragm (AODD) pump that did not have an Efficiency Management System (EMS) incorporated into its Air Distribution System (ADS) versus one that did. This test was conducted using water as the media.

The non-EMS AODD pump was run at 100 psig air inlet against a discharge pressure of 20 psig. At these conditions, the non-EMS AODD pump used 130 scfm to achieve a flow rate of 116 gpm.

When the same test was conducted using an AODD pump with an EMS ADS, the same flow rate of 116 gpm was able to be achieved while "dialing back" the air usage so that the pump was not running at maximum capacity. In this test, the AODD pump with an EMS ADS reduced the air consumption by 42 percent (or 54 scfm) at the desired flow rate of 116 gpm.

 

Pages