If the old saying “Build something better and people will buy it” is correct, then a new bearing housing design will be of interest to those focused on reliability.
by Heinz P. Bloch
January 18, 2017

Either oil mist or pressurized oil delivered through a small nozzle will serve a set of 75-millimeter bearings at 4,200 rpm with little risk. In this case, I would not advocate anything similar to MPP’s proposal. We can only hope that someone will do it right instead of simply tweaking components here or there.

A set of truly advanced and well-engineered bearing protector seals should be part of “doing things right the first time.”

Finally, no process pump with rolling element bearings still requires the oil to be cooled. With a reasonable pump bearing housing oil sump capacity and the proper oil, the many thousands of pipestill bottoms and other hot service pumps in modern refineries have yet to see oil temperatures above 190 F (88 C). The product in some of these pumps is at 750 F (399 C), and still not a single one will ever need a properly selected synthetic oil to be cooled.

In some pump bearing housings, cooling introduces water vapor condensation. Many major oil refineries discontinued cooling water on rolling element bearings in the 1960s. Books and articles have been written on the subject.

Unfortunately, that was all the time I could find to communicate with MPP. Perhaps working with a knowledgeable consulting engineer would reduce his development cycle.

I did not dare recommend four hours of reading, which, nevertheless, might shorten the development time by several orders of magnitude and save tons of money.

If the old saying “Build something better and people will buy it” is correct, then a new bearing housing design will be of interest to those who are focused on reliability.

References
Bloch, Heinz P., “Petrochemical Machinery Insights,” (2016) Elsevier Publishing, Oxford, UK, and Waltham, MA; 750 pages; ISBN 978-0-12-809272-9

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