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March 2016

March 2016

Shifting trends in water use and changing sewage composition cause complex problems for the world’s sewer systems.
Modern continuous monitoring technologies are streamlining maintenance programs and improving plant operations.
When replacement parts or services are required, end users must research the pros and cons of different kinds of suppliers.
Properly sizing systems, utilizing well-trained operators and performing routine maintenance can help overcome day-to-day challenges.
A comprehensive approach to reverse engineering helped to establish the differences between the stainless steel and original bronze impellers.
A Mississippi River levee, an Indiana water plant and an Ohio municipality take advantage of ease of installation and significant energy savings—as much as $2 million up front.
This technology can improve pump maintenance programs by lowering operating costs through extended mean time between repairs.
The Claude 'Bud' Lewis Carlsbad Desalination Plant in Southern California uses reverse osmosis to produce more than 50 million gallons of drinking water daily.
The self-priming pump systems offer flow rates up to 9,770 gallons per minute and can handle solids up to 4.9 inches in diameter.